Ambulatory Infusion System

Does This Pump Go With This Jacket?


Dog and nonhuman primate ambulatory infusion require three key components. First, a laboratory animal jacket. Second, a small battery driven infusion pump. And third, a vascular access catheter or port. Often, end users will gather disparate components for several suppliers to effect this preclinical test article delivery system. These systems often are adequate. However, in order to assure a high quality, turnkey large animal infusion system, LOMIR Biomedical and Orchesta Infusion cooperate to facilitate the needs of toxicology and safety pharmacology researchers.


Developed in partnership with Orchesta Infusion, our ambulatory infusion system allows animals freedom of movement

This canine and monkey test article dosing system allows the animal to roam freely in its cage or pen without the need for tethering apparatus. The use of this model continues to grow. The foundation of the system is the animal jacket. Such dog and nonhuman primate jackets are have been used in infusion models for decades. They may be purchased as off-the-shelf products or precisely fitted by species, weight, and special application requirements. One such special requirement involves the fitting of the pump, its fluid bag, and fluid lines within the jacket. In certain applications, these components fit within a single jacket pouch. In other applications, two pouches may be required.

Lastly, the dog and nonhuman primate ambulatory infusion model requires a catheter. For shorter term infusions (i.e., a few days), a temporary catheter may be used. For longer-term infusions (i.e., 30 days or more), a long-term tunneled catheter or implanted access port is the norm. Any of these catheter options require a tube to connect to the pump. Most tubing utilizes luer connectors, while the port utilizes a luer connector on the pump end a non-coring (Huber) needle on the port end.

LOMIR Biomedical and Orchesta Infusion work to integrate the jacket, pumps, drug bag, tubing, and catheter or port into an efficient, well-fitting system for laboratory animal toxicology and safety pharmacology infusion. This turnkey system likely will provide an apparatus which is less stressful to the dog or nonhuman primate and result in fewer complications and thus less animal-to-human contact. Further, it will simplify the purchasing of the system and allow for easier operation by the end user.

For more information visit the Orchesta Infusion website.